Tag Archives: featured

LuneOS October Stable release: Eggnog Latte

Happy Halloween! The long wait is finally over #LuneOS and #webOS fans! We’re back with a new release called “Eggnog Latte” which is a milestone in terms of developments and paves the way forward!

So you’re wondering what we’ve been up to since our previous stable release at the end of last year?

Continue reading LuneOS October Stable release: Eggnog Latte

The New Palm phone is revealed.

There’s a new Palm phone. It’s due to be released next month.

Now, if you are a long time Palm enthusiast (and reader of this blog) you will no doubt be telling your heart not to beat too quickly because to put it mildly, things have not worked out well in the past.

We already knew that TCL / Alcatel had bought the brand (only). The possibility of a new phone running webOS was dismissed. The speculation on the webOs Nation forum was that we would be seeing a standard Android slab with the Palm logo stuck on, though no one could figure out quite how that would be a success.
Continue reading The New Palm phone is revealed.

A Quick Tour of webOS OSE on the Raspberry Pi

The release of fresh webOS code from LG in the form of webOS Open Source Edition was unexpected. There’s been some interest in what exactly it is.

Fortunately, web developer, Garrett Downs has the Raspberry Pi 3 needed to run the code and we have a guest post with his first impressions:

When I saw a tweet from @webOSdev announcing webOS OSE was available to install on a Raspberry Pi 3, I knew what I’d be doing that night after work. Unfortunately, the process to build it requires hours of time and a computer running Linux natively (virtual machines are not recommended). I didn’t have either of those things. Luckily, someone had already built it and made the image available to download. Sweet! I put the image on a SD card, loaded it into my Pi, and powered it up.

After booting, you’re greeted with a nice splash screen with the webOS OSE logo in the corner. The recommended first thing to do is go into settings and connect to ethernet or Wi-Fi, so that’s what I did. That’s actually the only thing you can do in the settings right now. The only other section contains some basic info about the OS and that’s it. Alright, how about apps?

As this is the very first version of the project, I wasn’t expecting much here. Pressing F1 on the keyboard triggers the app menu to slide in from the right side of the screen. There are three “apps” in there, but they’re nothing more than website wrappers. ‘Enact’ and ‘webOS OSE’ will bring you to two sites with lots of info about the OSE project and how to get started developing. The third is ‘YouTube’, which is obviously a YouTube app. I haven’t tried signing into my Google account, but videos on the landing page work just as they should.

The interface doesn’t have cards like we know them from old webOS or the small tiles of webOS TV. I’m not sure how webOS OSE handles switching between apps. They only really told us how to open the app list. I’m curious to learn more about this.

I’d say that this is a pretty barebones OS in its current form. It seems to be the TV OS with a lot of the stuff removed (or just not accessible yet?), like the apps along the bottom of the homescreen, content store, most of the settings, etc. I think it’s enough for developers to start poking around though. I don’t know if it’s touchscreen-enabled, but I would assume so.

So, that’s all there is to see for now, at least from an end user’s point of view. If you happen to be an app developer like me, there are already some tools on the webOS OSE site to get started tinkering. I’ve had some limited success getting a couple of my apps up and running. If you’re looking to dig deeper than app dev, the entire project is open source so feel free to dive right in! The documentation for app development seems to be pretty decent considering how new this project is.

If you don’t want to bother setting up a Raspberry Pi, I made a short video showing most of what I mentioned above.

A webOS user’s story and why the webOS community is the best

Karen

If you’re an active member of the webOS community these days, you’ll know we’re a small, tight-knit group of friendly folks. Our three subgroups tend to be mostly free-time developers, advanced users, and those that are hanging on to the form factor/mobile OS despite its limited services and with little regard for the do-it-all-for-you modern devices.

The forums on webOS Nation continue to be the primary source for communication and provide the venue for meeting the occasional “newcomer” to our little slice of the web. This is the story of one such friend of webOS. Meet KarenContinue reading A webOS user’s story and why the webOS community is the best